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SE 199: Discovering Computing

Book Review vs. Book Report

According to the Purdue Online Writing Lab:

Book reports are informative reports that discuss a book from an objective stance. . . . Book reports commonly describe what happens in a work; their focus is primarily on giving an account of the major plot, characters, thesis, and/or main idea of the work.

Book reviews . . . offer a brief description of the text’s key points and often provide a short appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of the work. . . . A book review gives readers a sneak peek at what a book is like, whether or not the reviewer enjoyed it, and details on purchasing the book.

What is a review?

According to the Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:

Above all, a review makes an argument. The most important element of a review is that it is a commentary, not merely a summary. It allows you to enter into dialogue and discussion with the work’s creator and with other audiences. You can offer agreement or disagreement and identify where you find the work exemplary or deficient in its knowledge, judgments, or organization. You should clearly state your opinion of the work in question, and that statement will probably resemble other types of academic writing, with a thesis statement, supporting body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Examples